Monday, June 26, 2006

The Week that Will Be (and the weekend that was)

Because I will be very busy the rest of this week, I'll only be making one or two more posts this week. It's my goal to have a piece out about the relative talent at Navy (where some one is seen out of High School in regards to other programs), and hopefully (but don't hold me to this) a positional evaluation of the WR positions. If you guessed Notre Dame and Stanford as the top two teams, your right, but I guess you'll just have to wait the week out until I finish ranking the rest.

I was able to (briefly) say "'Sup" and shake the hands of Rob Caldwell, Brian Hampton, and Zach Gallion on Saturday during the Orioles game against the Nationals at Camden Yards. They all seemed like fine young men (I heard a lot of people comment about Rob's USMC insignia) and seemed interested that I brought my 2005 Army-Navy program for them to sign. It seemed like mostly younger kids were digging the autograph part (which is perfectly fine in my book), but it did disappoint me when the two assholes behind me said they could take Zach, who they referred to as a "Fat F***." The two idiots also said something along the lines of why can't they get Maryland players to do a booth. Mr. A reminds the citizens of Baltimore that most of Maryland’s player's flunked basket weaving last year and have to take summer school, which most likely lead to their absence. Anyways, just to see if Rob knew how good he really was, I said something along the lines of "so you were what, 10th or 11th in tackles last year." He smiled and simply said "tenth." Damn this team is going to kick East Carolina's ass.

2 comments:

Phelix said...

I would pay money to see those guys try to take on Gallion.

Navy94 said...

Funny about those guys, most people don't think much about SEALs either until they're taken down. With any decent amount of training physical attributes don't seem to mean much anymore.

Any decent amount of LINE training (hand-to-hand combat) would quickly change someone's mind. Unfortunately most LINE training involves mortally wounding someone, so their mind wouldn't be changed for long.